Article Suggestions


Articles I have found and enjoyed:

  1. Genome at Home: Biohackers Build Their Own Labs - Wired (Erin Biba)
  2. Biomarker for chronic fatigue syndrome identified - Standford (Hanae Armitage)
  3. A Legendary Scientist Sounds Off on the Trouble With STEM - Charlie Tyson & E.O. Wilson

    Consider a young person who’s thrilled by seeing a natural system, a remarkable geological formation that stirs the imagination, or a group of animals or plants. This youngster says, Boy, when I get to college, I would like to move on to a career in science, and biology especially. Now, the STEM-oriented teacher — if we are following the STEM ideology as we hear it — says: “I think that’s a good ambition. But remember that biology is based substantially upon chemistry. So, I advise you to start getting a good background in chemistry. Oh, and while you’re at it, you should keep in mind that chemistry is based upon, to a major degree, principles of physics. So consider starting to get a background in physics, too. And, oh, I almost forgot: To get into physics, and a lot of the best parts of chemistry, you’re going to need ‘M,’ mathematics. So I want you to get started on math courses right now.”

    Now, I’m going to say something startling. And I’m going to get myself in trouble. But heck, that’s why you’re here.

    Q. Yes.

    A. And I’m going to say: Nonsense!

    The right way to create a young scientist who’s going to be on fire by the time they’re in college is to let them pick something, some subject, that has really excited them. If they dream of space exploration, if they dream of curing a cancer, if they dream of going to distant jungles and discovering new species — whatever their dream is, let them dream.